Q: I’ve never played hockey with BTSH before and I wanna get in on the action, but it says that you have no room for new teams. What gives?

A: If you look at the Past Seasons’ Standings page, it seems like we’ve gone thru lots of teams in BTSH, but in fact, we’ve just gone thru lots of name changes; most of our teams can trace their roots to our first season, and with few teams dropping out from year to year and not enough time on a Sunday afternoon to add games, we only have room for new players as individuals, not groups. For those interested/willing to join as a free agent, the only way to play *in* BTSH is to play *with* BTSH– at scrimmages. There are official league pre-season scrimmages in March, and unofficial weekday scrimmages during the warmer months. You can find out about these scrimmages on this here site and thru our mailing list (click on contact for more info).

Q: Where are these scrimmages?

A: At BTSH HQ, Tompkins Sq. Park and Moffo Rink/Tanahey Park. Check Location under League Info for directions and maps.

Q: So how do I register?

A: Because BTSH teams are controlled by the captains, we cannot assign free agents to teams. At scrimmages, you put the word out you’re looking for a place to play, and odds are, a team will pick you up. That captain will give you the info to register online, and, if it’s before the start of the season, s/he’ll work out the fee with you so you can start playing in April. If you’re looking to sign up after May, you can still hook up with a captain at scrimmage so s/he can give you the registration info you need, but the fee goes to the league at that point, not the captain. There’s no registration after a certain point in September

Q: Do I have to be good at hockey to play with BTSH?

A: No. You just have to want to run around a bit, be willing to endure a little pain (while we are anti-violence, hockey ain’t croquet), and not be afraid of meeting new people, including strangers at a scrimmage (see above).

Q: If your motto is “It’s On, Asshole!” and you refer to “the kicking of hockey ass,” how come your rules don’t allow checking, slap shots, or even stick lifting?

A: BTSH has both beginner friendly rules and something we like to call a sense of humor. If you’re the kind of person who lacks the humor sense/actually wants a hockey game that will lead to fisticuffs, BTSH is not the game for you. Might we suggest joining Chelsea Piers or any fundamentalist religion.


Q: I play with a league in NJ/NY/PA/TX/UK and would like to arrange some sort of tourney with you guys. How does that work?
A: BTSH supports several local tournaments on an annual basis (check the news and blog portions of the site for details). Many BTSH players also participate in other tournaments. However, because we play in a public park, it’s difficult for us to host tournaments (requires lots of permits and the goodwill of our park neighbors).. If you really want us to host a tournament, contact the league commissioner with your event plan.

Q: Can I start my own BTSH franchise in my hometown of Anyplace, Somewhereopia?

A: While BTSH’s methodology of sticks’n'ballsin’ it is unique, we don’t own the trademark on it, and, as far as we’re concerned, hockey is public domain (or property of Canada, but they’re usually down to share). We do, however, own the copyright on our logo and such, so if you want to be official BTSH for some reason, we can try to work something out, but that seems a little unnecessary, and that’s coming from a group who’d stand to gain from your cash.

Q: Well, without being an official BTSH off-shoot, I’d like to start a hockey league in my quiet hamlet. What do I do?

A: If you’re looking to play real hockey (ice, roller, whatever), odds are, your local community center/sports facility already organizes such a thing. Leagues like BTSH, however, aren’t so much centered on the sport but the act of getting together with other fun-driven people. If that’s what you’re really looking to get going in your own neck of the woods, find some players, get some pavement to play on, and make sure your league is focused on community, ie, have league meetings, get captains’ input, and try and organize events that bring your players together. BTSH was created in equal parts to play hockey and meet new people, which is what makes it different from more legit hockey leagues in the city and probably more fun. So don’t just plan for the games, but for the BBQ after. Organizing a hockey league is hard work with little to no cash reqard, and while winning games is nice, it isn’t as much of a reward as making a lot of new friends and having fun on a weekend afternoon. Well, you asked.